Emergency Medical Science Bridge Program

Two EMS vehicles in a parking lot
Program Code: A45340BR

Emergency Medical Science Bridge Program

The Emergency Medical Science Bridge Program is designed to allow currently certified non-degree paramedics to earn an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree in Emergency Medical Science.

Specific Requirements

  1. General college admission requirements:
    1. Complete application for admission.
    2. Successfully complete College Placement Test.
    3. Official transcript of any prior college credit on file with admissions office.
  2. Possess current North Carolina driver’s license.
  3. Complete interview with EMS Department faculty.
  4. Current Paramedic certification. (A copy of the Paramedic Education Program Transcript must be on file in the EMS Department.)
  5. Current Basic Cardiac Life Support certification.
  6. Current Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification.
  7. Current Basic Trauma Life Support or pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support certification.
  8. Current Pediatric Advanced Life Support certification.
  9. The above certifications and experience (4-8) will provide 40 hours of proficiency credit toward the A.A.S. degree and will count toward the A-B Tech residency requirement. These 40 hours represent the major area (EMS) courses required for EMT, Advanced EMT, and Paramedic certification that are not required as part of the EMS Bridge Program.

The above certifications and experience (4-9) will provide 40 hours of proficiency credit toward the A.A.S. degree and will count toward the A-B Tech residency requirement. These 40 hours represent the major area (EMS) courses required for EMT-Basic, EMT-Intermediate, and Paramedic certification that are not required as part of the EMS Bridge Program.

Courses requiring a minimum grade of "C" or better: BIO, EMS

Courses in this program

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces rescue scene management. Topics include response to hazardous material conditions, incident command, and extrication of patients from a variety of situations. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and manage rescue operations based on initial and follow-up scene assessment.

This course examines the principles governing the maintenance of emergency vehicles and EMS communication equipment and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include applicable motor vehicle laws affecting emergency vehicle operation, defensive driving, collision avoidance techniques, communication systems, and information management systems. Upon completion, students should have a basic knowledge of emergency vehicles, maintenance, and communication needs.

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course provides an activity-based approach that develops measurement skills and mathematical literacy using technology to solve problems for non-math intensive programs. Topics include unit conversions and estimation within a variety of measurement systems; ratio and proportion; basic geometric concepts; financial literacy; and statistics including measures of central tendency, dispersion, and charting of data.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the use of mathematics and technology to solve practical problems and to analyze and communicate results. 

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course is designed to provide currently credentialed state or national Paramedic students with the most current education trends in Paramedic Practice. Emphasis is placed on transitions in healthcare. Upon completion, students should be able to integrate emerging trends in pre-hospital care.

This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate problem-solving skills as a team leader in simulated patient scenarios and is required for paramedic certification. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, integration of didactic and psychomotor skills, and effective performance in simulated emergency situations. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and appropriately respond to a variety of EMS related events.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers advanced patient assessment techniques and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include initial assessment, medical-trauma history, field impression, complete physical exam process, on-going assessment, and documentation skills. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic communication skills and record and report collected patient data.

This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Students entering this course should be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a technical field and should anticipate interdepartmental evaluation of course projects.

This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Total Credit Hours Required:
29

Curriculum is based on the 2021-22 catalog.

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