Information Technology: Information Systems A.A.S.

Information Systems
Program Code: A25590IS

Information Technology: Information Systems A.A.S.

The Information Systems curriculum is designed to prepare graduates for employment with organizations that use computers to process, manage, and communicate information. This is a flexible curriculum that can be customized to meet community information system needs.

Course work will develop a student’s ability to communicate complex technical issues related to computer hardware, software, and networks in a manner that computer users can understand. Classes cover computer operations and terminology, operating systems, database, networking, security, and technical support.

Graduates should qualify for employment in entry-level positions with businesses, educational systems, and governmental agencies that rely on computer systems to manage information. Graduates should be prepared to sit for industry-recognized certification exams.

Specific Requirements

  1. General college admission requirements must be met.
  2. Transfer credit will not be accepted for CTS-135, CTS-285 or CTS-289.

Specific Requirements

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: ACA, CIS, CSC, CTI, CTS, DBA, GIS, NET, NOS, WBL, and WEB

 

Course credit to be given for specific industry certifications.

Courses in this program

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals.

This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include the identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. Microsoft Office will be used in this course; this includes Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.

This course covers the introduction of the tools and resources available to students in programming, mark-up language, and services on the Internet. Topics include standard mark-up language Internet services, creating web pages, using search engines, file transfer programs; and database design and creation with DBMS products. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of programming tools, deploy a web-site with mark-up tools, and create a simple database table.

This course introduces students to the Network concepts, including networking terminology and protocols, local and wide area networks, and network standards. Emphasis is placed on securing information systems and the various implementation policies. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic tasks related to networking mathematics, terminology, media, and protocols.

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course introduces students to a broad range of operating system concepts, including installation and maintenance. Emphasis is placed on operating system concepts, management, maintenance, and resources required. Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of OS concepts, installation, management, maintenance, using a variety of operating systems. The course will include file management and simple user creation under at least two operating systems.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces computer programming and problem-solving in a structured program logic environment. Topics include language syntax, data types, program organization, problem-solving methods, algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon completion, students should be able to use top-down algorithm design and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming language.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics (Quantitative).

This course covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations, and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of the system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device drivers.

This course instructs students in the Windows or Linux based program suites for word processing, spreadsheet, database, personal information manager, and presentation software. This course prepares students for introductory level skills in database, spreadsheet, personal information manager, word processing, and presentation applications to utilize data sharing. Upon completion, students should be able to design and integrate data at an introductory level to produce documents using multiple technologies.

This course introduces database design and creation using a DBMS product. Emphasis is placed on data dictionaries, normalization, data integrity, data modeling, and creation of simple tables, queries, reports, and forms. Upon completion, students should be able to design and implement normalized database structures by creating simple database tables, queries, reports, and forms.

This course develops the necessary skills for students to develop both GUI and command-line skills for using and customizing a Linux workstation. Topics include Linux file system and access permissions, GNOME Interface, VI editor, X Window System expression pattern matching, I/O redirection, network and printing utilities. Upon completion, students should be able to customize and use Linux systems for command line requirements and desktop productivity roles. This is a Red Hat Academy course.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

The course introduces the role of IT in managing business processes and the need for business processes and IT alignment. Emphasis is placed on the industry need for understanding business challenges and developing/managing information systems to contribute to the decision-making process based on these challenges. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the ‘hybrid business manager’ and the potential offered by new technology and systems. Students will acquire the skills to prepare themselves and their work for a career in the information technology field.

This course is designed to develop SQL programming proficiency. Emphasis is placed on data definition, data manipulation, and data control statements as well as on report generation. Upon completion, students should be able to write programs which create, update and produce reports.

This course provides an activity-based approach that develops measurement skills and mathematical literacy using technology to solve problems for non-math intensive programs. Topics include unit conversions and estimation within a variety of measurement systems; ratio and proportion; basic geometric concepts; financial literacy; and statistics including measures of central tendency, dispersion, and charting of data.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the use of mathematics and technology to solve practical problems and to analyze and communicate results. 

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course introduces computer training and support techniques. Topics include methods of adult learning, training design, delivery, and evaluation, creating documentation, and user support methods. Upon completion, students should be able to design and implement training and provide continued support for computer users.

This course covers database administration issues and distributed database concepts. Topics include database administrator (DBA) goals and functions, backup and recovery, standards and procedures, training, and database security and performance evaluations. Upon completion, students should be able to produce functional DBA documentation and administer a database.

This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System and reviews GIS applications. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects. Upon completion, students should be able to identify GIS hardware components, typical operations, products/applications, and differences between database models and between raster and vector systems. The ESRI software used in the course only works in a Windows environment.

This course provides an introduction to web development software suites. Topics include the creation of web sites and applets using web development software. Upon completion, students should be able to create entire web sites and supporting applets.

Take one elective:  CTS-220, NOS-220, NOS-230, WEB-213, WBL-212/215

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides an opportunity to complete a significant support project with minimal instructor assistance. Emphasis is placed on written and oral communication skills, project definition, documentation, installation, testing, presentation, and user training. Upon completion, students should be able to complete a project from the definition phase through implementation.

This course introduces operating system concepts for single-user systems. Topics include hardware management, file and memory management, system configuration/optimization, and utilities. Upon completion, students should be able to perform operating systems functions at the support level in a single-user environment.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Total Credit Hours Required:
70

See your advisor for General Education substitutes.

Curriculum is based on the 2021-22 catalog.

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