Occupational Therapy Assistant A.A.S.

Occupational Therapy Assistant
Program Code: A45500

Occupational Therapy Assistant A.A.S.

The Occupational Therapy Assistant curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of a registered/licensed occupational therapist in screening, assessing, planning, implementing treatment, and documenting progress for clients receiving occupational therapy services.

Coursework includes human growth and development, conditions that interfere with activities of daily living, theory and process of occupational therapy, individual/group treatment activities, therapeutic use of self, activity analysis, and grading/adapting activities and environments.

Graduates may be eligible to take the national certification examination for practice as certified occupational therapy assistants. Employment opportunities include hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, long-term/extended care facilities, sheltered workshops, schools, home health programs, and community programs.

Specific Requirements

  1. General college admission requirements.
  2. This program has a selective selection process. See Selective Allied Health Program Criteria on the Selective and Limited Programs page of the A-B Tech website.
  3. Final admission to the OTA program shall be contingent upon documentation of physical and emotional health that would provide evidence indicative of the applicant’s ability to provide safe care to the public.
  4. Completed medical and immunization records must be submitted before fieldwork begins.
  5. Satisfactory completion of required immunizations prior to admission to fieldwork sites. Affiliated fieldwork sites for OTA will require an onboarding process, which will include a criminal background check and drug screen prior to the term in which the first fieldwork experience will occur. If any fieldwork facility refuses to allow the student to participate in fieldwork experiences, for any reason, the student will not be able to progress in the program.
  6. Current American Heart Association (AHA) Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers certification is required prior to beginning OTA-161 in the second semester and must be maintained throughout the program. This certification must include hands-on skills demonstration of one and two-rescuer adult, child, and Infant CPR, and AED use. Course certifications from any other providers will not be accepted.
  7. Students accepted into the program must attend a required program orientation session which will be scheduled in the spring of the year they intend to enter the program.
  8. Students applying to the OTA program must successfully complete ACA-115, BIO-168, and MED-120 (or acceptable substitutes) with a “C” or better prior to full acceptance into the program.
  9. Students applying to the OTA program are encouraged to have successfully completed: BIO-169, ENG-111, ENG-112, PSY-150, PSY-241, PSY-281, COM-120, and HUM-115 prior to program admission due to the rigorous nature of the OTA curriculum.
  10. OTA students will be required to complete fieldwork experiences, which may require them to travel as much as 1-1/2 hours from campus.
  11. Students must complete all graduation requirements in a timely manner. This includes completion of all Level II fieldwork within 18 months following completion of the didactic portion of the program.

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: ACA, BIO, COM, ENG, HUM, MED, OTA, PSY

Courses in this program

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals.

This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the vocabulary, abbreviations, and symbols used in the language of medicine. Emphasis is placed on building medical terms using prefixes, suffixes, and word roots. Upon completion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and define accepted medical terms.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course introduces occupational therapy (OT) theory, practice, philosophy, and principles. Emphasis is placed on providing a basic understanding of the profession as well as beginning to develop interaction and observation skills. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the domain and practice of occupational therapy, practice settings, and professional roles, OT terminology, activity analysis, principles, process, philosophies, and frames of reference.

This course provides training in recognizing the therapeutic value and use of a wide variety of human occupations including basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation. Topics include the understanding of different teaching and learning methods and styles, the language of occupational therapy (OT), OT interventions including preparatory methods and tasks, and restorative and compensatory techniques.

This course introduces the roles and responsibilities of the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) and the occupational therapist (OT) in occupational therapy practice and facilitates the development of professional behaviors and skills. Topics include professional ethics, supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative professional relationships; credentialing, certification, and licensure; documentation, which communicates the need and rationale for occupational therapy services; therapeutic use of self; and professional identity and professional behaviors; and observation skills.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and argumentative strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing data and incorporating research findings into documented argumentative essays and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using standard research format and style. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course provides training in appropriate and accurate assessment skills related to sensation, movement, vision, perception, cognition, emotions, and performance of basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. Topics include physical and psychosocial factors affecting performance; and sensory, range of motion, strength, coordination, cognitive, visual-perceptual, self-care, and work-related assessments.

This course provides training in understanding and using principles of normal human movement. Topics include terminology, structures of the body associated with movement, principles of motion, analysis of movement, joint structure and its impact on motion, and muscle actions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in identifying terms associated with movement, motions, structures, normal ranges and directions of motion, and general principles of human movement; and apply biomechanical principles to safe and efficient functional mobility activities.

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills needed for working with individuals experiencing various medical conditions to help them achieve participation in life through engagement in occupation. Topics include medical terminology, common conditions, body functions that change with disease processes, applicable theories and principles, assessment and intervention priorities for commonly treated conditions.

This course provides introductory-level clinical training opportunities. Emphasis is placed on observational and basic interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse client population. Upon completion, students should be able to use observational and interactional skills to relate effectively with clients under the guidance/direction of fieldwork supervisors.

This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations.

This course provides introductory-level clinical training opportunities. Emphasis is placed on observational and basic interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse client population. Upon completion, students should be able to use observational and interactional skills to relate effectively with clients under the guidance/direction of fieldwork supervisors.

This course provides introductory-level clinical training opportunities. Emphasis is placed on observational and basic interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse client population. Upon completion, students should be able to use observational and interactional skills to relate effectively with clients under the guidance/direction of fieldwork supervisors.

This course covers professional development, supervisory relationships, involvement in the profession, and clinic management skills. Topics include clarification of roles and responsibilities, a detailed examination of the supervisory process, participation in professional organizations, and the mechanics of assisting in clinic operations. Upon completion, students should be able to work effectively with a supervisor, plan and implement a professional activity, and perform routine clinic management tasks.

This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides knowledge and skills needed for working with children from birth through adolescence. Topics include a review of normal growth and development, habituation of healthy habits/routines, the role of occupational therapy with caregivers/providers, understanding of common conditions and developmental delays; and the role of occupation in assessment, intervention planning and implementation with pediatric populations.

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills needed for working with individuals experiencing various psychosocial conditions to help them achieve participation in life through engagement in occupation. Topics include mental health conditions, applicable theories and principles, symptoms of dysfunction, assessment and treatment of individuals, planning and facilitating therapeutic groups, client safety, therapeutic use of self, and psychosocial aspects of practice.

This course provides training in appropriate and accurate assessment and intervention skills related to orthotics, prosthetics, assistive devices, assistive technology, client mobility, and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) issues. Topics include ergonomics seating and positioning, community mobility, use of physical agent modalities, and technology in occupational therapy intervention.

This course provides preparation for Fieldwork II experiences using skills/knowledge gained in OTA-140 and OTA-240 to promote integration into the professional community. Topics include interview skills, resume production, conflict resolution, professional presentations, participation in research activities, and completion of all forms required for Fieldwork II. Upon completion, students should be able to independently complete employment-seeking activities and provide in-service training.

This course provides knowledge and skills needed for working with adults through the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on identification and discussion of common changes associated with aging, disabilities and chronic diseases affecting this population, assessments and intervention, including developing healthy habits and routines, and the impact on participation in occupation in various settings. Upon completion, students should be able to plan, implement, and modify appropriate interventions with adults in their context and environment to promote engagement in occupations.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides clinical experience under the direct supervision of experienced occupational therapists or occupational therapy assistant practitioners working in various practice settings. Emphasis is placed on final clinical preparation for entry-level practice in the profession. Upon completion, students should be able to meet all critical competencies for entry-level practice established by the curriculum, AOTA guidelines, and regulatory bodies.

This course provides the final clinical experience under the direct supervision of experienced occupational therapists or occupational therapy assistant practitioners working in various practice settings. Emphasis is placed on final clinical preparation for entry-level practice in the profession. Upon completion, students should be able to meet all critical competencies for entry-level practice established by the curriculum, AOTA guidelines, and regulatory bodies.

This course provides closure to the educational program in conjunction with clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on portfolio development and presentation, program evaluation, analysis and synthesis of clinical experiences, and final preparation for the certification examination. Upon completion, students should be able to enter the occupational therapy (OT) workforce with an understanding of themselves as OT professionals, and with supporting documentation demonstrating progress toward meeting competencies set forth by the profession and regulatory bodies.

Total Credit Hours Required:
75

Curriculum is based on the 2022-23 catalog.

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