Veterinary Medical Technology A.A.S.

Veterinary Medical Technology
Program Code: A45780

Veterinary Medical Technology A.A.S.

The Veterinary Medical Technology curriculum is designed to prepare individuals to assist veterinarians in preparing animals, equipment, and medications for examination and surgery; collecting specimens; performing laboratory, radiographic, anesthetic, and dental procedures; assisting in surgery; and providing proper husbandry of animals and their environment.

Course work includes instruction in veterinary anatomy, nutrition, parasitology, pathology, physiology, radiology, terminology, zoology, office practices, laboratory techniques, dentistry, and small and large animal clinical practices.

Graduates of accredited programs may be eligible to take state and national examinations administered by the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Board.

Graduates may be employed in veterinary clinics; diagnostic, research, or pharmaceutical laboratories; zoos; academic institutions; or other areas associated with animal care.

This program is accredited by:
American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA)
1931 North Meacham Road, Suite 100
Schaumburg, IL 60173-4360

Specific Requirements

  1. General college admission requirements.
  2. High school units: Chemistry required; biology and algebra highly recommended.
  3. This program has a competitive selection process. See Fall Competitive Allied Health Program Criteria on the Selective and Limited Programs page of the A-B Tech website.
  4. Final admission to the Veterinary Medical Technology program shall be contingent upon documentation of physical and emotional health that would provide evidence that is indicative of the applicants ability to provide safe care to animals.
  5. Satisfactory completion of required immunizations.
  6. Work-Based Learning sites may require criminal background checks and/or drug screening prior to acceptance/placement to that site. Work-Based Learning sites can refuse a student's acceptance/placement to that site if the student does not meet any standards set by the policies and procedures of that site. Placement in a Work-Based Learning site is not guaranteed.
  7. North Carolina Board for Veterinary Medicine may require criminal background checks on all applicants for initial credentialing.

Courses requiring a grade of "C" or better: ACA, CHM, MAT, VET, WBL

Courses in this program

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals.

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course covers the structure and function of the animal body with emphasis on the similarities and differences among domestic animals. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of the major physiological systems of domestic, laboratory, and zoo animals. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the relevant anatomical structure and describe basic physiological processes for the major body systems.

This course covers the basic medical terminology required for veterinary technicians. Topics include the pronunciation, spelling, and definition of word parts and vocabulary terms unique to the anatomy, clinical pathology, and treatment of animals. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of basic medical terms as they relate to veterinary medicine. It is highly recommended that this course be taken in the first semester of the Veterinary Technology program.

This course is designed to teach basic administrative techniques, client communication skills, and regulations pertaining to veterinary medicine. Topics include record keeping, telephone techniques, professional liability, office procedures, state and national regulatory laws, human relations, and animal welfare. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate effective communication techniques, office procedures, and knowledge of regulatory laws and issues relating to animal welfare.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides a survey of basic facts and principles of general, organic, and biochemistry. Topics include measurement, molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, solutions, acid-base chemistry, gas laws, and the structure, properties, and reactions of major organic and biological groups. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is a laboratory for CHM-130. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHM-130. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic laboratory procedures and apply them to chemical principles presented in CHM-130. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a study of the individual breed characteristics and management techniques of the canine, feline, equine, bovine, porcine, ovine, caprine, and laboratory animals. Topics include physiological data, animal health management, and basic care and handling of animals. Upon completion, students should be able to identify breeds of domestic and laboratory animals, list physiological data, and outline basic care, handling, and management techniques.

This course provides an activity-based approach that develops measurement skills and mathematical literacy using technology to solve problems for non-math intensive programs. Topics include unit conversions and estimation within a variety of measurement systems; ratio and proportion; basic geometric concepts; financial literacy; and statistics including measures of central tendency, dispersion, and charting of data.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the use of mathematics and technology to solve practical problems and to analyze and communicate results. 

This course covers the common internal and external parasites of companion animals, livestock, selected zoo animals, and wild animals. Emphasis is placed on laboratory diagnosis of the most common forms of the parasite through fecal, urine, skin and blood exams. Upon completion, students should be able to identify common parasites and discuss life-cycles, treatment and prevention strategies, and public health aspects of veterinary parasitology.

This course introduces basic immunology, fundamentals of disease processes including inflammation, and common infectious diseases of animals and their prevention through immunization. Topics include fundamental disease processes, principles of medical therapy, immunologic processes, infections and zoonotic diseases of domestic animals, and prevention of disease. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the basic disease and immunological processes, recognize infections and zoonotic diseases, and discuss prevention strategies.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course includes the fundamental study of hematology, hemostasis, and urinalysis. Emphasis is placed on basic hematology and urinalysis techniques, manual skill development, instrumentation, quality control, and applications to veterinary science. Upon completion, students should be able to perform manual and automated CBCs, hemostatic assays, and complete urinalyses and maintain laboratory equipment and quality control.

This course introduces the basic practices and techniques of the veterinary clinic and biomedical research fields for dogs, cats, and laboratory animals. Topics include physical exam, husbandry, housing, sanitation, restraint and handling, administration of medications, anesthesia and euthanasia techniques, grooming and dentistry. Upon completion, students should be able to properly restrain, medicate, examine, groom, and maintain each of the species studied.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Students entering this course should be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a technical field and should anticipate interdepartmental evaluation of course projects.

This course includes the study of basic disease processes, fundamentals of pathology and other selected topics of veterinary medicine. Topics include histopathology, pathologic changes associated with common diseases of animals, necropsy procedures, specimen handling, and other selected material. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic pathological changes associated with disease, recognize histopathologic changes, and properly perform collection and submission of necropsy specimens.

This course covers advanced hematology, serology, immunology, and clinical chemistry. Topics include advanced hematologic, serologic, and immunologic test procedures, manual and automated clinical chemistry procedures, laboratory safety, and quality control. Upon completion, students should be able to collect, prepare, and analyze serum and plasma samples and outline quality control and safety procedures.

This course covers basic radiography, anesthesia techniques, dentistry, sample collection and handling, surgical assistance and instrumentation, sterile techniques, and patient record keeping. Topics include basic radiology, injectable and gas anesthesia, dentistry, instrument identification and care, sterile surgical technique, specimen collection and processing, and maintenance of patient records. Upon completion, students should be able to take and process radiographs, administer and monitor anesthesia, assist in surgical procedures, collect specimens, and maintain surgical records.

This course introduces drugs and other substances utilized in veterinary medicine. Emphasis is placed on drug classification and methods of action, administration, effects and side effects, storing and handling of drugs and dosage calculations. Upon completion, students should be able to properly calculate and administer medications, recognize adverse reactions, and maintain pharmaceutical inventory and administration records.

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the basic principles of microbiology, histology, and cytology. Emphasis is placed on the collection of microbiological samples for culture and sensitivity and collection and preparation of samples for histological and cytological examination. Upon completion, students should be able to perform microbiological culture and sensitivity and evaluate cytology and histology specimens.

The course covers advanced anesthetic techniques, special radiographic techniques, advanced dentistry, sample collection and processing, bandaging, and emergency and critical care procedures. Topics include induction and maintenance of anesthesia, radiographic contrast studies, advanced dentistry, external coaptation, intensive care procedures, and advanced sample collection techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in sample collection, radiology, anesthesia, critical care and emergency procedures, and dentistry.

This course covers the topics relevant to the medical and surgical techniques for the common domestic large animal species. Topics include physical exam, restraint, sample collection, bandaging, emergency treatment, surgical and obstetrical procedures and instruments, herd health, and lameness topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely perform restraint, examination, and sample collection; assist surgical, obstetrical, and emergency procedures; and discuss herd health.

This course covers the principles of nutrition and their application to feeding practices of domestic, farm, and companion animals. Topics include basic nutrients and nutritional needs of individual species, proximate analysis, interpretation of food and feed labels, types of animal foods, and ration formulation. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate diets for animals in various stages of health and disease, analyze nutrition labels, and identify foods.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides a work-based learning experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student's program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

Total Credit Hours Required:
70

See advisor for General Education substitutions.

Curriculum is based on the 2020-21 catalog.

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