Associate in Science in Teacher Preparation


The Associate in Arts/Associate in Science in Teacher Preparation degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit (SHC) of college transfer courses. Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and basic computer use.

The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) and the Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (ICAA) enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year associate in arts programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina and to Signatory Institutions of North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities to transfer with junior status.

Community college graduates must obtain a grade of “C” or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale in order to transfer with a junior status. Courses may also transfer through bilateral agreements between institutions.

 

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: ACA, ART, CHM, COM, EDU, ENG, HUM, MAT, PSY, and SOC

Courses in this program

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition.

This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.


 

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

See advisor for General Education Electives (3 credits)

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and argumentative strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing data and incorporating research findings into documented argumentative essays and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using standard research format and style. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangle, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

See advisor for General Education Electives (3 credits)

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the examination of the American educational systems and the teaching profession. Topics include the historical and philosophical influences on education, various perspectives on educational issues, and experiences in birth through grade 12 classrooms. Upon completion, students should be able to reflect on classroom observations, analyze the different educational approaches, including classical/traditional and progressive, and have knowledge of the various roles of educational systems at the federal, state and local levels.

This course provides information and strategies necessary for transfer to a teacher licensure program at a senior institution. Topics include entry-level teacher licensure exam preparation, performance-based assessment systems, requirements for entry into teacher education programs, the process to become a licensed teacher in North Carolina, and professionalism including expectations within the field of education.

This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

See advisor for General Education Electives (3 credits)

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.


 

This course presents some major dimensions of human experience as reflected in art, music, literature, philosophy, and history. Topics include the search for identity, the quest for knowledge, the need for love, the individual and society, and the meaning of life. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize interdisciplinary connections and distinguish between open and closed questions and between narrative and scientific models of understanding.

Total Credit Hours Required:
61

Curriculum is based on the 2021-22 catalog.