Computer-Aided Drafting Technology A.A.S.

Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) Technology
Program Code: A50150

Computer-Aided Drafting Technology A.A.S.

The Computer-Aided Drafting Technology curriculum prepares students to apply technical skills and advanced computer software and hardware to develop plans and related documentation and manage the hardware and software of a CAD system. Includes instruction in architectural drafting, computer-assisted drafting, and design (CADD), creating and managing two and three-dimensional models, and linking CAD documents to other software applications, and operating systems. Graduates should qualify for CAD jobs in architectural and engineering firms and industrial design businesses. Sustainable design practices are emphasized.

Specific Requirements

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: ARC, DFT, EGR, and MAC

Courses in this program

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces basic architectural drafting techniques, lettering, use of architectural and engineer scales, and sketching. Topics include orthographic, axonometric, and oblique drawing techniques using architectural plans, elevations, sections, and details; reprographic techniques; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and print scaled drawings within minimum architectural standards.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of Building Information Modeling (BIM) as a construction documentation system. Topics include basic parametric modeling, creating new types and families of components, and using 3D models to create design drawings. Upon competition, students should be able to use BIM software to create, edit, and print rudimentary architectural 3D computer models.
 

This course provides a laboratory setting to enhance architectural BIM skills. Emphasis is placed on further development of basic parametric modeling, creating new types and families of components. Upon competition, students should be able to use BIM software to create, edit, and print rudimentary architectural 3D computer models.
 

This course introduces CAD software as a drawing tool. Topics include drawing, editing, file management, and plotting. Upon completion, students should be able to produce and plot a CAD drawing.

This course introduces general topics relevant to engineering technology. Skills developed include goal setting and career assessment, professional ethics, critical thinking and problem solving, using college resources for study and research, and using tools for engineering computations. Upon completion, students should be able to choose a career option in engineering technology and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals.

This course covers the basic principles of blueprint reading and sketching. Topics include multi-view drawings; interpretation of conventional lines; and dimensions, notes, and thread notations. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret basic drawings, visualize parts, and make pictorial sketches.

This course introduces sustainability issues and individual contributions toward environmental sustainability.  Topics include management processes needed to maximize renewable/non-renewable energy resources, economics of sustainability, and reduction of environmental impacts. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss sustainability practices and demonstrate an understanding of their effectiveness and impacts.

This course introduces sustainability issues and individual contributions toward environmental sustainability.  Topics include management processes needed to maximize renewable/non-renewable energy resources, economics of sustainability, and reduction of environmental impacts. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss sustainability practices and demonstrate an understanding of their effectiveness and impacts.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces construction materials and their methodologies. Topics include construction terminology, materials and their properties, manufacturing processes, construction techniques, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to detail construction assemblies and identify construction materials and properties.

This course covers advanced concepts of Building Information Modeling (BIM) including complex drawing generation and inter-disciplinary collaboration. Topics include advanced parametric modeling and model analysis, inter-disciplinary coordination, design web format models, material take-off, schedules, and rendering. Upon completion, students should be able to apply BIM software to create full 3D project models and convert them to scaled working or presentation drawings.
 

This course provides a laboratory setting to enhance advanced architectural BIM skills. Emphasis is placed on further development of advanced parametric modeling and model analysis, inter-disciplinary coordination, design web format models, material take-off, schedules, and rendering. Upon completion, students should be able to apply BIM software to create full 3D project models and convert them to scaled working or presentation drawings.
 

This course is a continuation of DFT-151. Topics include advanced two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and solid modeling and extended CAD applications. Upon completion, students should be able to generate and manage CAD drawings and models to produce engineering documents.

This course introduces more complex industrial blueprints. Emphasis is placed on auxiliary views, section views, violations of true project, special views, applications of GD & T, and interpretation of complex parts. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret complex industrial blueprints.

This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem-solving. Topics include basic geometric and proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces plumbing, mechanical (HVAC), and electrical systems for the architectural environment. Topics include basic plumbing, mechanical, and electrical systems for residential and/or commercial buildings with an introduction to selected code requirements. Upon completion, students should be able to perform related calculations.

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course covers basic principles of three-dimensional CAD wireframe and surface models. Topics include user coordinate systems, three-dimensional viewpoints, three-dimensional wireframes, and surface components and viewpoints. Upon completion, students should be able to create and manipulate three-dimensional wireframe and surface models.

This course is an introduction to basic three-dimensional solid modeling and design software. Topics include basic design, creation, editing, rendering and analysis of solid models and creation of multiview drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to use design techniques to create, edit, render and generate a multiview drawing.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers repairing, servicing, and upgrading computers and peripherals in preparation for industry certification. Topics include CPU/memory/bus identification, disk subsystems, hardware/software installation/configuration, common device drivers, data recovery, system maintenance, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely repair and/or upgrade computer systems to perform within specifications.

This course presents a continuation of basic three-dimensional solid modeling and design software. Topics include the advanced study of parametric design, creation, editing, rendering and analysis of solid model assemblies, and multiview drawing generation. Upon completion, students should be able to use parametric design techniques to create and analyze the engineering design properties of a model assembly.

This course is a capstone course experience for programs with a focus on computer-aided design. Emphasis is placed on the use of design principles and computer technology in planning, managing, and completing a design project. Upon completion, students should be able to plan and produce engineering documents of a design project, including solid models, working drawings, bom’s, annotations, and spreadsheets.

This course introduces CAD/CAM. Emphasis is placed on transferring part geometry from CAD to CAM for the development of a CNC-ready program. Upon completion, students should be able to use CAD/CAM software to produce a CNC program.

This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System and reviews GIS applications. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects. Upon completion, students should be able to identify GIS hardware components, typical operations, products/applications, and differences between database models and between raster and vector systems. The ESRI software used in the course only works in a Windows environment.

Total Credit Hours Required:
67

Curriculum is based on the 2024-2025 catalog.

Good To Know

Why General Education?

You may be asking yourself, “Why do I have to take (course name) when it is not directly related to my major?”

General Education courses will help you develop skills necessary to be successful in your major and in life. General Education can teach you how to talk to your employer, write a paper in a major course, understand interest rates on your car, and much more. General Education can also give you the skills to be a better member of society and a more informed citizen. Critical thinking, global understanding, and appreciation for the human experience are hallmarks of a well-rounded education.

How many hours of General Education do I have to take?

If you are enrolled in an Associate of Applied Science Degree program, a minimum of 15 general education hours are required in the following categories:

  • Six hours from Communication
  • Three hours from Humanities & Fine Arts
  • Three hours from Social & Behavioral Science
  • Three hours from Natural Science & Mathematics

General Education courses have been pre-selected for you by your faculty from the following list:

CommunicationHumanities & Fine ArtsSocial & Behavioral ScienceNatural Science & Mathematics
COM-110ART-111ECO-251BIO-161
COM-120ART-114ECO-252BIO-163
COM-231ART-115HIS-111BIO-168
ENG-110HUM-110HIS-112MAT-110
ENG-111HUM-115HIS-131MAT-121
ENG-112MUS-110HIS-132MAT-143
ENG-114MUS-112POL-120MAT-152
 PHI-215PSY-150MAT-171
 PHI-240SOC-210PHY-110/110A
  SOC-225PHY-121

 

Degrees designed to transfer to universities require more general education hours. If you are enrolled in the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science, you are required to take 45 hours of General Education from the following categories:

  • Six hours in English Composition
  • Six to nine hours in Communication/Humanities & Fine Arts
  • Six to nine hours in Social & Behavioral Sciences
  • Three to eight hours in Mathematics
  • Four to eight hours in Natural Sciences
  • 11 to 14 additional General Education hours

If you are enrolled in the Associate in Engineering, you are required to take 42 general education hours from the following:

  • Six hours in English Composition
  • Six hours in Communication/Humanities & Fine Arts
  • Six work hours in Social & Behavioral Sciences
  • 12 hours in Mathematics
  • 12 hours in Natural Sciences

If you are enrolled in the Associate in Fine Arts in Visual Arts, you are required to take 25 general education hours from the following:

  • Six hours in English Composition
  • Six hours in Communication/Humanities & Fine Arts
  • Six hours in Social & Behavioral Sciences
  • Three to four hours in Mathematics
  • Four hours in Natural Sciences

Additional information about General Education for transfer degrees, including courses that satisfy each category, may be found in the current College Catalog.

What will I learn in General Education?

At A-B Tech, our faculty have designed a general education core so that A-B Tech graduates will learn the following:

Students will critically evaluate information:

  • Students will demonstrate information literacy.
  • Students will critique works of human expression.
  • Students will analyze scientific literature.

Students will solve problems:

  • Students will identify processes.
  • Students will analyze problems.
  • Students will interpret the results.
  • Students will recommend appropriate strategies or solutions.

Students will effectively communicate.

  • Students will communicate appropriately about the subject.
  • Students will communicate appropriately with the audience.
  • Students will communicate appropriately for the medium.

Ever wonder how A-B Tech awards credit for a certain course?

A-B Tech complies with the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges Code, so your courses are assigned the course level and receive the same amount of credit as courses at all 58 North Carolina Community Colleges.

If you want to read more about this, see the A-B Tech Policy and Procedure for the Assignment of Course Level Credit.

Get insight on 7 Computer-Aided Drafting Technology career choices, and find what's right for you

Launch Career Coach