Electrical Systems Technology A.A.S.

Electrical Systems Technology
Program Code: A35130

Electrical Systems Technology A.A.S.

The Electrical/Electronics Technology curriculum is designed to provide training for persons interested in the installation and maintenance of electrical/electronic systems found in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities.

Training, most of which is hands-on, includes such topics as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, digital electronics, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, the National Electric Code, and other subjects as local needs require.

Graduates should qualify for a variety of jobs in the electrical/electronics field as an on-the-job trainee or apprentice, assisting in the layout, installation, and maintenance of electrical/electronic systems.

Specific Requirements

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: ALT, EGR, ELC, ELN, HYD, ISC, SST, and WBL

Courses in this program

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces general topics relevant to engineering technology. Skills developed include goal setting and career assessment, professional ethics, critical thinking and problem solving, using college resources for study and research, and using tools for engineering computations. Upon completion, students should be able to choose a career option in engineering technology and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of electricity and test equipment to nonelectrical/electronic majors. Topics include basic DC and AC principles (voltage, resistance, current, impedance); components (resistors, inductors, and capacitors); power; and operation of test equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and analyze simple DC and AC circuits using electrical test equipment.

This course introduces the care/usage of tools and materials used in residential electrical installations and the requirements of the National Electrical Code. Topics include NEC, electrical safety, and electrical print reading; planning, layout; and installation of electrical distribution equipment; lighting; overcurrent protection; conductors; branch circuits; and conduits. Upon completion, students should be able to properly install conduits, wiring, and electrical distribution equipment associated with residential electrical installations.

This course is designed to develop informative and business writing skills. Emphasis is placed on the logical organization of writing, including effective introductions and conclusions, precise use of grammar, and appropriate selection and use of sources. Upon completion, students should be able to produce clear, concise, well-organized short papers.

This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem-solving. Topics include basic geometric and proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

This course provides a work-based learning experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student's program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers layout, planning, and installation of wiring systems in industrial facilities. Emphasis is placed on industrial wiring methods and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to install industrial systems and equipment.

This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

This course covers the fabrication methods required to create a prototype product from the initial circuit design. Topics include CAD, layout, sheet metal working, component selection, wire wrapping, PC board layout and construction, reverse engineering, soldering, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design and construct an electronic product with all its associated documentation.

This course covers workplace environmental health and safety concepts. Emphasis is placed on managing the implementation and enforcement of environmental health and safety regulations and on preventing accidents, injuries, and illnesses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of environmental health and safety.

This course extends the concepts covered in MAT-121 to include additional topics in algebra, function analysis, and trigonometry. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, transformations of functions, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits.

This course introduces computer software which can be used to solve electrical/electronics problems. Topics include electrical/electronics calculations and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize a personal computer for electrical/electronics- related applications

This course provides laboratory assignments as applied to fundamental principles of DC/AC electricity. Emphasis is placed on measurements and evaluation of electrical components, devices and circuits. Upon completion, the students will gain hands-on experience by measuring voltage, current, and opposition to current flow utilizing various meters and test equipment.

This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to install PLCs and create simple programs.

This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, MSI and LSI circuits, AC/DC converters, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

This course covers the managerial principles and practices required for organizations to succeed in modern industry, including quality and productivity improvement. Topics include the functions and roles of all levels of the management, organization design, planning and control of the manufacturing operation, managing conflict, group dynamics, and problem-solving skills. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of management principles and integrate these principles into job situations.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the basic principles of automated systems and describes the tasks that technicians perform on the job. Topics include the history, development, and current applications of robots and automated systems including their configuration, operation, components, and controls. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the basic concepts of automation and robotic systems.

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course covers the use of the current National Electrical Code. Topics include the NEC history, wiring methods, overcurrent protection, materials, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively use the NEC.

This course covers the fundamentals of instrumentation used in the industry. Emphasis is placed on electric, electronic, and pneumatic instruments. Upon completion, students should be able to design, install, maintain, and calibrate instrumentation.

This course covers programming and applications of programmable logic controllers. Emphasis is placed on programming techniques, networking, specialty I/O modules, and system troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to specify, implement, and maintain complex PLC controlled systems.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Total Credit Hours Required:
76

See advisor for General Education substitutes.

Curriculum is based on the 2021-22 catalog.

Get insight on 5 Electrical Systems Technology career choices, and find what's right for you

Launch Career Coach