Computer Engineering Technology A.A.S.

Computer Engineering Technology
Program Code: A40160

Computer Engineering Technology A.A.S.

A course of study that prepares the students to use basic engineering principles and technical skills for installing, servicing, and maintaining computers, peripherals, networks, and microprocessors, and computer-controlled equipment. Includes instruction in mathematics, computer electronics and programming, prototype development and testing, systems installation and testing, solid-state and microminiature circuitry, peripheral equipment, and report preparation. Graduates should qualify for employment opportunities in electronics technology, computer service, computer networks, server maintenance, programming, and other areas requiring knowledge of electronic and computer systems. Graduates may also qualify for certification in electronics, computers, or networks.

Specific Requirements

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: CET, CSC, EGR, ELC, and ELN

Courses in this program

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers repairing, servicing, and upgrading computers and peripherals in preparation for industry certification. Topics include CPU/memory/bus identification, disk subsystems, hardware/software installation/configuration, common device drivers, data recovery, system maintenance, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely repair and/or upgrade computer systems to perform within specifications.

This course introduces general topics relevant to engineering technology. Skills developed include goal setting and career assessment, professional ethics, critical thinking and problem solving, using college resources for study and research, and using tools for engineering computations. Upon completion, students should be able to choose a career option in engineering technology and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals.

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem-solving. Topics include basic geometric and proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of electricity and test equipment to nonelectrical/electronic majors. Topics include basic DC and AC principles (voltage, resistance, current, impedance); components (resistors, inductors, and capacitors); power; and operation of test equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and analyze simple DC and AC circuits using electrical test equipment.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the basic principles of automated systems and describes the tasks that technicians perform on the job. Topics include the history, development, and current applications of robots and automated systems including their configuration, operation, components, and controls. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the basic concepts of automation and robotic systems.

This course introduces computer software which can be used to solve electrical/electronics problems. Topics include electrical/electronics calculations and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize a personal computer for electrical/electronics- related applications

This course extends the concepts covered in MAT-121 to include additional topics in algebra, function analysis, and trigonometry. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, transformations of functions, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits.

This course provides the fundamentals of data communications in a manufacturing environment. Emphasis is placed on the principles and techniques required to implement data transfer between automated systems and plant information systems using current technology and devices. Upon completion, students should be able to plan, design, and implement data communication systems within the manufacturing environment

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces procedural programming for engineering applications. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating data, sequencing, iteration, and blocking of code. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level.

This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to install PLCs and create simple programs.

This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, MSI and LSI circuits, AC/DC converters, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

This course covers the fabrication methods required to create a prototype product from the initial circuit design. Topics include CAD, layout, sheet metal working, component selection, wire wrapping, PC board layout and construction, reverse engineering, soldering, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design and construct an electronic product with all its associated documentation.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers programming and applications of programmable logic controllers. Emphasis is placed on programming techniques, networking, specialty I/O modules, and system troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to specify, implement, and maintain complex PLC controlled systems.

This course introduces microprocessor architecture and microcomputer systems including memory and input/output interfacing. Topics include assembly language programming, bus architecture, bus cycle types, I/O systems, memory systems, interrupts, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor circuits and programs using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

This course introduces the fundamentals of electronic communication systems. Topics include the frequency spectrum, electrical noise, modulation techniques, characteristics of transmitters and receivers, and digital communications. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret analog and digital communication circuit diagrams, analyze transmitter and receiver circuits, and use appropriate communication test equipment.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Total Credit Hours Required:
74

Students seeking a transfer for a bachelor’s degree in engineering technology should consult their advisor about the Math requirements at the transfer university.

Curriculum is based on the 2020-21 catalog.

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