Mechanical Engineering Technology A.A.S.

Student mechanical engineering test
Program Code: A40320

Mechanical Engineering Technology A.A.S.

A course of study that prepares students to use basic engineering principles and technical skills to design, develop, test, and troubleshoot projects involving mechanical systems. Includes instruction in principles of mechanics, applications to specific engineering systems, design testing procedures, prototype and operational testing and inspection procedures, manufacturing system-testing procedures, test equipment operation and maintenance, computer applications, critical thinking, planning, and problem-solving, and oral and written communications.

Graduates of the curriculum will find employment opportunities in the manufacturing or service sectors of engineering technology.  Engineering technicians may obtain professional certification by application to organizations such as ASQC, SME, and NICET.

Specific Requirements

Courses requiring a grade of “C” or better: ATR, BPR, DFT, EGR, ELC, HYD, ISC, MAC, MAT, MEC, PLA, and WBL

Courses in this program

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the basic principles of print reading. Topics include line types, orthographic projections, dimensioning methods, and notes. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret basic prints and visualize the features of a part or system.

This course introduces general topics relevant to engineering technology. Skills developed include goal setting and career assessment, professional ethics, critical thinking and problem solving, using college resources for study and research, and using tools for engineering computations. Upon completion, students should be able to choose a career option in engineering technology and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals.

This course introduces personal computer software and teaches students how to customize the software for technical applications. Emphasis is placed on the use of common office applications software such as spreadsheets, word processing, graphics and Internet access. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competency in using applications software to solve technical problems and communicate the end results in text and graphical formats.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of electricity and test equipment to nonelectrical/electronic majors. Topics include basic DC and AC principles (voltage, resistance, current, impedance); components (resistors, inductors, and capacitors); power; and operation of test equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and analyze simple DC and AC circuits using electrical test equipment.

This course is designed to develop informative and business writing skills. Emphasis is placed on the logical organization of writing, including effective introductions and conclusions, precise use of grammar, and appropriate selection and use of sources. Upon completion, students should be able to produce clear, concise, well-organized short papers.

This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem-solving. Topics include basic geometric and proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces CAD software as a drawing tool. Topics include drawing, editing, file management, and plotting. Upon completion, students should be able to produce and plot a CAD drawing.

This course introduces the principles of industrial safety. Emphasis is placed on industrial safety and OSHA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environment and OSHA compliance.

This course introduces the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, FRL, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the operation of a fluid power system, including design, application, and troubleshooting.

This course extends the concepts covered in MAT-121 to include additional topics in algebra, function analysis, and trigonometry. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, transformations of functions, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

This course introduces shop safety, hand tools, machine processes, measuring instruments, and the operation of machine shop equipment. Topics include the use and care of tools, safety, measuring tools, and the basic setup and operation of common machine tools. Upon completion, students should be able to safely machine simple parts to specified tolerances.

This course introduces a variety of manufacturing materials and common processing techniques. Emphasis is placed on the processing, testing, and application of materials such as wood, metals, plastics, ceramics, and composites. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental engineering applications for a variety of materials, including their process capabilities and limitations.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the basic principles of automated systems and describes the tasks that technicians perform on the job. Topics include the history, development, and current applications of robots and automated systems including their configuration, operation, components, and controls. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the basic concepts of automation and robotic systems.

This course is an introduction to basic three-dimensional solid modeling and design software. Topics include basic design, creation, editing, rendering and analysis of solid models and creation of multiview drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to use design techniques to create, edit, render and generate a multiview drawing.

This course includes vector analysis, the equilibrium of force systems, friction, sectional properties, stress/strain, and deformation. Topics include resultants and components of forces, moments and couples, free-body diagrams, shear and moment diagrams, trusses, frames, beams, columns, connections, and combined stresses.  Upon completion, students should be able to analyze simple structures.

This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to install PLCs and create simple programs.

This course provides theory and processing experience with the injection molding process. Topics include machine type, molds, controls, machine-polymer part relationship, molding factors, troubleshooting, and molding problems/solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of machine setup and operation and be able to optimize common injection molding machines.

Take one elective:  BPR-121, ELC-117, WBL-111, or WBL-122.

Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers the operation of advanced industrial robots. Topics include the classification of robots, activators, grippers, work envelopes, computer interfaces, overlapping work envelopes, installation, and programming. Upon completion, students should be able to install, program, and troubleshoot industrial robots.

This course presents a continuation of basic three-dimensional solid modeling and design software. Topics include the advanced study of parametric design, creation, editing, rendering and analysis of solid model assemblies, and multiview drawing generation. Upon completion, students should be able to use parametric design techniques to create and analyze the engineering design properties of a model assembly.

This course provides the opportunity to design an instructor-approved project using previously acquired skills. Emphasis is placed on selection, proposal, design, testing, and documentation of the approved project. Upon completion, students should be able to present and demonstrate projects.

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree.

Total Credit Hours Required:
72

See advisor for General Education substitutes.

Curriculum is based on the 2020-21 catalog.

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