Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree


The Associate in Science degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit (SHC) of college transfer courses. Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic computer use.

The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) and the Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (ICAA) enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year associate in science programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina and to Signatory Institutions of North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities to transfer with junior status.  

Community college graduates must obtain a grade of “C” or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in order to transfer with a junior status.  Courses may also transfer through bilateral agreements between institutions. 

See your advisor for specific pathways.

Curriculum is based on the 2020-21 catalog.

Courses in this program

6 Minimum Required Hours - English

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and argumentative strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing data and incorporating research findings into documented argumentative essays and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using standard research format and style. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition.

6 Minimum Required Hours - Humanities/Fine Arts

Courses must be from two different disciplines.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations.

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading an eighteenth century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading a nineteenth-century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique the philosophical components of an issue. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

6 Minimum Required Hours - Social/Behavioral Science

Select six hours from the following.  One course must be an HIS course. 

Courses must be from at least two disciplines.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

8 Minimum Required Hours - Mathematics

Select 8 hours from the following:

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangle, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science.

This is the first of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science.

8 Minimum Required Hours - Natural Sciences

Select 8 hours from the list below. The following courses must be paired:

BIO 111 General Biology I and BIO 112 General Biology II

CHM 151 General Chemistry I and CHM 152 General Chemistry II

PHY 110 Conceptual Physics and PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab

PHY 151 College Physics I and PHY 152 College Physics II

PHY 251 General Physics I and PHY 252 General Physics II

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course is a continuation of BIO-111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associate in Science.

This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.
 

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree.

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

8 Minimum Required Hours - Additional General Education

HUM 220 Human Values and Meaning is Required.

Additional Hours - Select 8 credit hours from courses listed below:

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the nature of human culture. Emphasis is placed on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and analyzed.

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces students to the field of graphic design. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of visual communication, the design process and the ability to evaluate and discuss design issues in a critical manner. Upon completion, students should be able to use contemporary design software and visual language techniques as they apply to creative visual problem-solving involving typography, image manipulation, symbolic representation, and page management while being responsive to the relationship between client, designer, and audience.

This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques used in designing and producing interactive projects. Emphasis is placed on the interactive development process, aesthetics of visual solutions, technical proficiency, and graphical user interface (GUI) with projects including digital imaging, web design, simple animation, graphics, and copyright issues.

This course introduces an overall view of modern astronomy. Topics include an overview of the solar system, the sun, stars, galaxies, and the larger universe. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the universe around them. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

The course is a laboratory to accompany AST-111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance the materials presented in AST-111 and which provide practical experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the universe around them. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course is a continuation of BIO-111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associate in Science.

This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of communication and the skills necessary to communicate in various contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and mass communication situations. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and illustrate the forms and purposes of human communication in a variety of contexts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Communication.

This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations.

This course introduces techniques of cultural research, definitions, functions, characteristics, and impacts of cultural differences in public address. Emphasis is placed on how diverse backgrounds influence the communication act and how cultural perceptions and experiences determine how one sends and receives messages. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles and skills needed to become effective in communicating outside one’s primary culture.

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course introduces the basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions for economic problems faced by the private and government sectors. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Students entering this course should be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a technical field and should anticipate interdepartmental evaluation of course projects.

This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading an eighteenth century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading a nineteenth-century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a continuation of FRE-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written French and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the French language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a continuation of FRE-211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Attendance at five film showings and an in-depth written analysis of one film is required. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through a project and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship.

This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students will be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results.

This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangle, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science.

This is the first of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science.

This is the second of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations.  Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. .

This is the third of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrations, solid analytical geometry, vector-valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics.

This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique the philosophical components of an issue. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.
 

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree.

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the study of individual behavior within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of social influences on behavior. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides an in-depth study of current social problems. Emphasis is placed on causes, consequences, and possible solutions to problems associated with families, schools, workplaces, communities, and the environment. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, define, analyze, and propose solutions to these problems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course examines the influence of culture and social groups on individual behavior and personality. Emphasis is placed on the process of socialization, communication, conformity, deviance, interpersonal attraction, intimacy, race and ethnicity, small group experiences, and social movements. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze cultural and social forces that influence the individual in a society. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a continuation of SPA-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.  Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts.  Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a continuation of SPA-211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

15 Minimum Required Hours - Other

ACA 122 College Transfer Success

and

Additional Hours (8 hours).  

Any transfer course listed below or above may be used to meet this requirement.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course includes a greater emphasis on managerial and cost accounting skills. Emphasis is placed on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts, including product costing systems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the nature of human culture. Emphasis is placed on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and analyzed.

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the elements and principles of design as applied to two-dimensional art. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements, the principles of visual organization, and the theories of color mixing and interaction. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and use critical and analytical approaches as they apply to two-dimensional visual art. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces basic studio problems in three-dimensional visual design. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements and organizational principles as applied to mass and space. Upon completion, students should be able to apply three-dimensional design concepts. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the language of drawing and the use of various drawing materials. Emphasis is placed on drawing techniques, media, and graphic principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of graphic form and various drawing processes. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to introduce students to the elements and principles of design through the use of digital software. Emphasis is placed on developing composition and design skills using vector, raster, and time-based media. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and use tools in digital software, understand and utilize digital and artistic vocabulary, and employ the principles and elements of design to create artwork using digital means. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers resume writing, interview skills, and the preparation and presentation of an art portfolio. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of a portfolio of original artwork, the preparation of a photographic portfolio, approaches to resume writing, and interview techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to mount original art for portfolio presentation, photograph and display a professional slide portfolio, and write an effective resume. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces printmaking: its history, development techniques, and processes. Emphasis is placed on basic applications with an investigation into image source and development. Upon completion, students should be able to produce printed images utilizing a variety of methods. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the language of painting and the use of various painting materials. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and use of various painting techniques, media, and color principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of creative processes directed toward the development of expressive form. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces basic methods and techniques used in watercolor. Emphasis is placed on application, materials, content, and individual expression. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a variety of traditional and nontraditional concepts used in watercolor media. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces photographic equipment, theory, and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, darkroom technique, and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, develop, and print a well-conceived composition. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces digital photographic equipment, theory and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, computer photo manipulation, and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, digitally manipulate, and print a well-conceived composition. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement

This course introduces various aspects of basic video production including concept development, scripting, camera operation, and post-production. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, camera handling, storyboarding and editing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of video camera operation and production techniques. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to provide a framework for the production of a long-term video project. Emphasis is placed on the realization of the unique creative vision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce a thematically coherent, edited video with sound and titling. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces students to the field of graphic design. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of visual communication, the design process and the ability to evaluate and discuss design issues in a critical manner. Upon completion, students should be able to use contemporary design software and visual language techniques as they apply to creative visual problem-solving involving typography, image manipulation, symbolic representation, and page management while being responsive to the relationship between client, designer, and audience.

This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques used in designing and producing interactive projects. Emphasis is placed on the interactive development process, aesthetics of visual solutions, technical proficiency, and graphical user interface (GUI) with projects including digital imaging, web design, simple animation, graphics, and copyright issues.

This course provides an exploration of the creative and technical methods of sculpture with a focus on the traditional processes. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills as they pertain to three-dimensional expression in various media. Upon completion, students should be able to show competence in a variety of sculptural approaches. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an introduction to three-dimensional design principles using the medium of clay. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals of forming, surface design, glaze application, and firing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in slab and coil construction, simple wheel forms, glaze technique, and creative expression. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers advanced hand building and wheel techniques. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, surface design, sculptural quality, and glaze effect. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a high level of technical competence in forming and glazing with a development of three-dimensional awareness. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces an overall view of modern astronomy. Topics include an overview of the solar system, the sun, stars, galaxies, and the larger universe. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the universe around them. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

The course is a laboratory to accompany AST-111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance the materials presented in AST-111 and which provide practical experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the universe around them. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course is a continuation of BIO-111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associate in Science.

This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course covers the biochemistry of foods and nutrients with consideration of the physiological effects of specialized diets for specific biological needs. Topics include cultural, religious, and economic factors that influence a person’s acceptance of food, as well as nutrient requirements of the various life stages. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the functions and sources of nutrients, the mechanisms of digestion, and the nutritional requirements of all age groups.

This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis on microorganisms and human disease. Topics include an overview of microbiology and aspects of medical microbiology, identification, and control of pathogens, disease transmission, host resistance, and immunity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of microorganisms and the disease process as well as aseptic and sterile techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is placed on contracts, negotiable instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to be an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Upon completion, students should be able to work as contributing members of a team utilizing these functions of management. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include the identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. Microsoft Office will be used in this course; this includes Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.

This course introduces computer programming and problem-solving in a structured program logic environment. Topics include language syntax, data types, program organization, problem-solving methods, algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon completion, students should be able to use top-down algorithm design and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming language.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics (Quantitative).

This course provides a survey of basic facts and principles of general, organic, and biochemistry. Topics include measurement, molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, solutions, acid-base chemistry, gas laws, and the structure, properties, and reactions of major organic and biological groups. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is a laboratory for CHM-130. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHM-130. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic laboratory procedures and apply them to chemical principles presented in CHM-130. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

This course provides a systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers; further topics include isomerization, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of covered organic topics as needed in CHM-252. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course provides a continuation of the systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines and heterocyclics; multi-step synthesis will be emphasized. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of organic concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

The course covers the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Topics include structures, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of biomacromolecules including amino acids, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, enzymatic metabolic pathways, and biochemical genetics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental biochemical processes. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science.

This course covers principles of microbiology and the impact these organisms have on man and the environment. Topics include the various groups of microorganisms, their structure, physiology, genetics, microbial pathogenicity, infectious diseases, immunology, and selected practical applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills including microscopy, aseptic technique, staining, culture methods, and identification of microorganisms. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate career options. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces fundamental law enforcement operations. Topics include the contemporary evolution of law enforcement operations and related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to explain theories, practices, and issues related to law enforcement operations. There will be an emphasis on practical skills. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers the history, major philosophies, components, and current practices and problems of the field of corrections. Topics include historical evolution, functions of the various components, alternatives to incarceration, treatment programs, inmate control, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the various components, processes, and functions of the correctional system.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of communication and the skills necessary to communicate in various contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and mass communication situations. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and illustrate the forms and purposes of human communication in a variety of contexts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Communication.

This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations.

This course introduces techniques of cultural research, definitions, functions, characteristics, and impacts of cultural differences in public address. Emphasis is placed on how diverse backgrounds influence the communication act and how cultural perceptions and experiences determine how one sends and receives messages. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles and skills needed to become effective in communicating outside one’s primary culture.

This course introduces print and electronic media and the new information technologies in terms of communication theory and as economic, political, and social institutions. Topics include the nature, history, functions, and responsibilities of mass communication industries in a global environment and their role and impact in American society. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate awareness of the pervasive nature of mass media and how media operate in an advanced post-industrial society.

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication.

This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

The course introduces the role of IT in managing business processes and the need for business processes and IT alignment. Emphasis is placed on the industry need for understanding business challenges and developing/managing information systems to contribute to the decision-making process based on these challenges. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the ‘hybrid business manager’ and the potential offered by new technology and systems. Students will acquire the skills to prepare themselves and their work for a career in the information technology field.

This course introduces basic engineering graphics skills and applications. Topics include sketching, selection, and use of current methods and tools, and the use of engineering graphics applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic engineering graphics principles and practices. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions for economic problems faced by the private and government sectors. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course includes the theories of child development, observation and assessment, milestones, and factors that influence development, from conception through approximately 36 months. Emphasis is placed on knowledge, observation and assessment of developmental sequences in approaches to play/learning, emotional/social, health/physical, language/communication and cognitive domains.

This course includes the theories of child development, observation and assessment, milestones, and factors that influence development, from preschool through middle childhood. Emphasis is placed on knowledge, observation and assessment of developmental sequences in approaches to play/learning, emotional/social, health/physical, language/communication and cognitive domains.

This course introduces the examination of the American educational systems and the teaching profession. Topics include the historical and philosophical influences on education, various perspectives on educational issues, and experiences in birth through grade 12 classrooms. Upon completion, students should be able to reflect on classroom observations, analyze the different educational approaches, including classical/traditional and progressive, and have knowledge of the various roles of educational systems at the federal, state and local levels.

This course covers atypical patterns of child development, inclusive/diverse settings, evidenced-based educational/family plans, differentiated instruction, adaptive materials, and assistive technology. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of exceptionalities and delays, early intervention/special education, transitions, observation, developmental screening, formative assessment of children, and collaborating with families and community partners.

This course is an overview of the engineering profession. Topics include goal setting and career assessment, ethics, public safety, the engineering method, and design process, written and oral communication, interpersonal skills and team building, and computer applications. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the engineering process, the engineering profession, and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the concepts of engineering based on forces in equilibrium. Topics include concentrated forces, distributed forces, forces due to friction, and inertia as they apply to machines, structures, and systems. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems that require the ability to analyze systems of forces in static equilibrium. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an introduction to digital circuits and analysis. Topics include Boolean Algebra; mixed logic; design of combinational circuits; introduction to sequential systems; and MSI building blocks. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and design digital circuits and systems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an introduction to Kirchoff's laws and terminal equations, circuit analysis techniques and network theorems, transient and natural response, and state variable analysis. Topics include Kirchoff's laws, Ohm's law, circuit analysis techniques, Network theorems, singularity functions, transient and natural responses, power, and state variable analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze electric circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors to determine the required parameters.

This course provides laboratory experiments in network measurements and logic design and laboratory equipment and techniques. Topics include network measurement and applications, experimental logic design and introduction to laboratory equipment and techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to complete network measurement logic design and be able to use laboratory equipment with proper techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an introduction to engineering theory of deformable solids and applications. Topics include stress and deformation resulting from axial, torsion, and bending loads; shear and moment diagrams; Mohr's circle of stress; and strain and buckling of columns. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze solids subject to various forces and design systems using a variety of materials. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Students entering this course should be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a technical field and should anticipate interdepartmental evaluation of course projects.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice the art of creative writing. Emphasis is placed on writing fiction, poetry, and sketches. Upon completion, students should be able to craft and critique their own writing and critique the writing of others. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading an eighteenth century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading a nineteenth-century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a continuation of FRE-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written French and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the French language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a continuation of FRE-211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System and reviews GIS applications. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects. Upon completion, students should be able to identify GIS hardware components, typical operations, products/applications, and differences between database models and between raster and vector systems. The ESRI software used in the course only works in a Windows environment.

This course introduces the basics of emergency first aid treatment. Topics include rescue breathing, CPR, first aid for choking and bleeding, and other first-aid procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in providing emergency care for the sick and injured until medical help can be obtained. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a study of geographical, political, economic, and social conditions existing in North Carolina from America’s discovery to the present. Topics include native and immigrant backgrounds; colonial, antebellum, and Reconstruction periods; party politics; race relations; and the transition from an agrarian to an industrial economy. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in North Carolina. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Attendance at five film showings and an in-depth written analysis of one film is required. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is an introduction to news writing for newspapers and other print media including the techniques of news gathering, reporting, and interviewing. Emphasis is placed on basic methods of gathering information, conducting interviews, organizing a story, writing leads, writing clear, concise copy, and upon developing research skills. Upon completion, students should be able to write clear, concise, accurate, complete, balanced and readable news stories according to guidelines set by industry standards.

This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through a project and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship.

This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students will be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results.

This course is designed to provide a technology-based treatment of multiple sample inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on two-sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals, linear and multiple regression, analysis of variance, experimental design, and non-parametric techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to draw statistical inferences and communicate results on multiple sample data taken from business and health, social, natural, and applied sciences.

This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangle, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science.

This is the first of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science.

This is the second of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations.  Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. .

This is the third of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrations, solid analytical geometry, vector-valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics.

This course is designed to be an introduction to linear algebra topics. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, multi-dimensional linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization, and orthogonality. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to linear algebra-related problems with and without technology.

This course is designed to be an introduction to topics involving ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for first-order and linear higher-order differential equations, systems of differential equations, numerical methods, series solutions, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, and LaPlace transforms.

This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a comprehensive study of diatonic harmony. Emphasis is placed on voice leading tasks, part writing, and analysis using various labeling systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate harmonic principles through four-voice part writing, recognize and label non-harmonic tones, analyze chords using Roman numerals, figured bass, and lead sheet symbols, and classify small-scale phrase structure and cadence types. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a foundation in aural skills. Emphasis is placed on the development of sight-singing and ear training skills in diatonic melody, diatonic harmonic progression, and rhythmic patterns. Upon completion, students should be able to fluently read music in treble and bass clefs; utilize any solmization system while sight-singing simple diatonic melodies; identify elementary diatonic chord progressions; perform rhythms in simple and compound meters; and dictate diatonic melodic, diatonic harmonic, and advanced rhythmic patterns.

This course provides an introduction to the musical elements of melody, rhythm, and harmony. Emphasis is placed upon the interaction of these elements through fundamental analysis and an introduction to part writing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of melodic voice leading, rhythmic functions within simple and compound meters, and simple harmonic progressions. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a comprehensive study of diatonic harmony. Emphasis is placed on voice leading tasks, part writing, and analysis using various labeling systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate harmonic principles through four-voice part writing, recognize and label non-harmonic tones, analyze chords using Roman numerals, figured bass, and lead sheet symbols, and classify small-scale phrase structure and cadence types. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an opportunity to gain experience singing in a chorus.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study and performance of a variety of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides a continuation of studies begun in MUS-131.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study and performance of a variety of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is a continuation of MUS-132.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study and performance of a variety of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is a continuation of MUS-231.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to investigate and apply the basic concepts and principles of lifetime physical fitness and other health-related factors. Emphasis is placed on wellness through the study of nutrition, weight control, stress management, and consumer facts on exercise and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to plan a personal, lifelong fitness program based on individual needs, abilities, and interests. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the basics of weight training. Emphasis is placed on developing muscular strength, muscular endurance, and muscle tone. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement a personal weight training program. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers advanced levels of weight training. Emphasis is placed on meeting individual training goals and addressing weight training needs and interests. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement an individualized advanced weight training program. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers the skills necessary to participate in a developmental fitness program. Emphasis is placed on the circuit training method which involves a series of conditioning timed stations arranged for maximum benefit and variety. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and appreciate the role of circuit training as a means to develop fitness. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces fitness through walking. Emphasis is placed on stretching, conditioning exercises, proper clothing, fluid needs, and injury prevention. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in a recreational walking program. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces the basic discipline of yoga. Topics include proper breathing, relaxation techniques, and correct body positions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the procedures of yoga. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces more detailed aspects of the discipline of yoga. Topics include breathing and physical postures, relaxation, and mental concentration. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate advanced procedures of yoga. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to aid students in developing rudimentary skills in self-defense. Emphasis is placed on stances, blocks, punches, and kicks as well as non-physical means of self-defense. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic self-defense techniques of a physical and non-physical nature. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course is designed to aid students in building on the techniques and skills developed in PED-125. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate psychological and physiological responses to various encounters. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate intermediate skills in self-defense stances, blocks, punches, and kick combinations. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course emphasizes the fundamentals of golf. Topics include the proper grips, stance, alignment, swings for the short and long game, putting, and the rules and etiquette of golf. Upon completion, students should be able to perform the basic golf shots and demonstrate a knowledge of the rules and etiquette of golf. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course emphasizes the fundamentals of tennis. Topics include basic strokes, rules, etiquette, and court play. Upon completion, students should be able to play recreational tennis. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers the fundamentals of volleyball. Emphasis is placed on the basics of serving, passing, setting, spiking, blocking, and the rules and etiquette of volleyball. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational volleyball. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course covers the fundamentals of basketball. Emphasis is placed on skill development, knowledge of the rules, and basic game strategy. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational basketball. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides instruction on how to equip and care for oneself on the trail. Topics include clothing, hygiene, trail ethics, and necessary equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully participate in nature trail hikes. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course includes an explanation, demonstration, and participation in games that provide an alternative to traditional sports. Emphasis is placed on playing for pleasure rather than for competitive purposes. Upon completion, students should be able to participate and lead others in participating in non-competitive games.  This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides an introduction to the Pilates method of body conditioning exercise. Topics include instruction in beginning and intermediate Pilates exercises using a mat or equipment, history of the Pilates method, and relevant anatomy and physiology. Upon completion, students should be able to perform beginning and intermediate exercises and possess an understanding of the benefits of conditioning the body’s core muscles. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course provides continued instruction to the Pilates method of body conditioning exercise. Topics include instruction in intermediate and advanced Pilates exercises using a mat or equipment, relevant anatomy and physiology, and further discussion of related concepts. Upon completion, students should be able to perform intermediate and advanced exercises and possess the autonomy to maintain their own personal Pilates practice. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces martial arts using the Tai Chi form. Topics include proper conditioning exercises, proper terminology, historical foundations, etiquette, and drills. Upon completion, students should be able to perform skills and techniques related to this form of martial arts. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique the philosophical components of an issue. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.

This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.
 

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree.

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides a study of the effects of ideologies, trade, armaments, and alliances on relations among nation-states. Emphasis is placed on regional and global cooperation and conflict, economic development, trade, non-governmental organizations, and international institutions such as the World Court and UN. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss major international relationships, institutions, and problems.

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the study of individual behavior within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of social influences on behavior. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides an in-depth study of current social problems. Emphasis is placed on causes, consequences, and possible solutions to problems associated with families, schools, workplaces, communities, and the environment. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, define, analyze, and propose solutions to these problems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course examines the influence of culture and social groups on individual behavior and personality. Emphasis is placed on the process of socialization, communication, conformity, deviance, interpersonal attraction, intimacy, race and ethnicity, small group experiences, and social movements. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze cultural and social forces that influence the individual in a society. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences.

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

This course is a continuation of SPA-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.  Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts.

Total Credit Hours Required:
60
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